Grizzly 17” Band Saw (G0513ANV) Setup

he pTopics Covered
1. Purchase
2. Setup
……Step 1—Guide post handwheel
……Step 2—Positive stop bolt
……Step 3—Quick-release tension lever
……Step 4—Move blade guides away from blade
……Step 5—Remove the saw blade
……Step 6—Install band saw table
……Step 7—Reinstall the blade
……Step 8—Check & adjust tracking of the blade
……Step 9—Square tabletop to blade
……Step 10—Dust collection
……Step 11—Electrical power plug
……Step 12—Test run
……Step 13—Blade tensioning
……Step 14—Adjust distance between blade guides and blade gullets
……Step 15—Adjust distance between blade guides and blade
……Step 16—Adjust distance between back of blade & support bearings
……Step 17—Align the table to the blade & fence
……Step 18—Calibrate the miter gauge relative to the blade
3. Resawing Video
4. Summary
5. Request

1. Purchase
Knocking $20 off the sale price and free shipping sounded good to me. So I ordered the Grizzly Model No. G0513ANV band saw. And with 17” wheels and a 2-hp motor, I was looking forward to getting and powering this beast up.

Regarding cost, I paid $875 for this saw (back in Feb 2015).

Here are the stats for the Grizzly Model G0513ANV band saw.

1st Photo--DSC05798


I ordered a lift for $34 to get the band saw off the delivery truck. That was money well spent.

Photo 1 below shows the 20” x 30” x 81” crated up band saw along with the two-wheel truck used for moving the band saw from the front yard to the backyard. (The crated up band saw weighed 350 pounds.)

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Photo 1

UPS shipped the band saw, and UPS provided tracking which was nice. Regarding the UPS tracking, Grizzly, with your order confirmation, provided the link for UPS tracking.

Here is the ramp (Photo 2) I built for getting it into my shop, and the two-wheel truck I used for moving it into my shop is shown above in Photo 1. The ramp was built out of two 2 x 4s and 1/2” x 21-1/2” x 62” OSB as shown in the following photo. For the two-step stairs at my shop entrance, placing a length of 4 x 4 under the ramp made for a less abrupt transition from ramp to the shop floor.

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Photo 2

Getting the band saw from the front yard to my shop in the backyard was a bear. But hey it is a Grizzly. And getting it up the ramp and into my shop was even more of a bear. It would have been smart to have enlisted help in moving this 350 pound crated-up monster into my shop, but I did not. Still wonder, how I managed to get it into my shop.

After getting the crated up band saw into my shop and uprighting the crated band saw, I next removed the crating and unbolted the band saw from the pallet. Then, I tipped and rotated one side of the band saw off of the pallet: I nailed the pallet to my wood floor (plywood) to keep the pallet from moving while rotating one side of the band saw off of the pallet.

I enlisted a neighbor (thanks, AL) to rotate the band saw off of the pallet. And the band saw was relatively easy to move about once off the pallet with the aid of a 2”-diameter schedule 40 PVC pipe placed under the band saw.

So far I have not bolted the band saw to the floor, and I have not had any problems with it dancing around on the floor. (My floor system consists of 3/4” plywood and 2 x 6-floor joists.)

2. Setup
The Owner’s Manual covers the setting up of your band saw; therefore, with that in mind the following discussion will hit the highlights and in some cases expand on what is in the Owner’s Manual.

Step 1–Install the guide post handwheel (Photo 3).

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Photo 3

Step 2—Next, install the positive stop bolt into the threaded hole of the band saw body as shown in Photo 4.

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Photo 4

Notes for Photo 4:
Note 1—For initial installation of positive stop bolt, I threaded the bolt into the band saw as required to clear the level shown lying across the top of the trunnions: this way the positive stop bolt will not interfere with the band saw table lying flat on the trunnions. (Installation of the table is addressed by Step 6.)

Note 2—After installing the table, the nut shown here will be tightened against the band saw body (when final adjusting of the positive stop is accomplished).

Step 3—To release tension on the blade, rotate the quick-release tension lever clockwise to the upright position as shown in Photo 5.

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Photo 5

Step 4—Before removing the saw blade, move the upper and lower blade guides away from the blade by loosening the thumb screws and moving the guides away from the blade. The upper blade guides are shown in Photo 6, and the lower blade guides are shown in Photo 7.

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Photo 6

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Photo 7

Step 5—Now remove the saw blade as follows:

(1) Remove the table insert shown in Photo 8. The purpose of the table insert is to keep the tabletop level adjacent to where the cutout section of the band saw table exists for removing the blade from the table.

Note regarding inserting the table insert–use hand pressure only to achieve a snug fit. Do not use a hammer or mallet to install—use hand pressure only. Otherwise, you could end up cracking your tabletop if you try forcing the table insert into the tabletop.

(2) Sometimes the tabletop split sections are not level. The pin helps to level and keep level the two split tabletop sections.

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Photo 8

(3) Open and remove both the upper and lower wheel doors from the saw (the doors easily lift off from where they’re hinged to the saw), then remove the blade off of the upper and lower wheels. Next, pass the blade thru the vertical slot on the saw body as shown in Photo 9. That completes the removal of the blade from the saw.

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Photo 9

Step 6—Using WD-40 and paper towels remove the grease type coating from the band saw table. Next, place the band saw table on top of the trunnions (reference Photo 4) and bolt the table to the trunnions with the four bolts, washers, and nuts provided with the band saw.

I used a combination of hand giggling and a rubber mallet to align the table and trunnions as required for aligning the table and trunnion bolt holes for fastening the two together.

I used a 13mm socket and ratchet for fastening the table and trunnions together—much faster than using the open-end wrench included with the band saw.

To install the two interior bolts (for fastening the table and trunnions together), rotate the table to 45* as shown in Photo 10. The two interior bolts are shown and labeled in Photo 10.

Rotating the table to 45* made it so much easier to install the two interior bolts.

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Photo 10
Step 7—Reinstall the blade, which is a reversal of the steps required to remove the blade.

Step 8—With the upper and lower blade guides still positioned as far away from the blade as possible and the blade tension lever still in the tightened position, do the following to check the tracking of the blade on the upper wheel:

(1) Rotate the blade tension handwheel until the tension needle reads between 4 and 6 (I set the tension needle at 5).

(2) With the upper wheel cover open, spin the upper wheel by hand at least three times and watch to see if the blade rides on the center of the wheel. If the blade travels along the center of the upper wheel, then no blade tracking adjustments are required.

(3) If the blade doesn’t travel along the center of the wheel, then the following blade tracking adjustments are required:

a) Unlock the blade tracking knob (reference Photo 11) on the back of the band saw behind the upper wheel.

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Photo 11

b) Spin the upper wheel with one hand and rotate the blade tracking knob with your other hand clockwise, to move the blade towards the back of the wheel.

c) Spin the upper wheel with one hand and rotate the blade tracking knob with your other hand counterclockwise, to move the blade towards the front of the wheel.

d) After centering the blade on the upper wheel, tighten the tracking control lock knob, and close the upper & lower wheel doors.

Step 9—The positive stop, which enables you to easily return the table to horizontal (0*)  after having the table at an angle other than 0*, is positioned as follows:

(1) Raise the blade guide post and place a square on the table and up against the side of the blade. Adjust the angle of the table until the table and blade are square to one another.

(2) Adjust the positive stop bolt up against the bottom of the table, and tighten the hex nut at the other end of the positive stop bolt against the band saw body.

(3) Check and adjust the table angle pointer to align with the 0* mark on the table tilt scale.

Step 10—Regarding dust collection, I’m only using one hose (connected to the upper port), and it is working out just fine. So far, no dust has built up inside the band saw.

I cut a 3-11/16”-diameter (that’s correct—3-11/16”-diameter) plug out of 3/4” OSB to plug the bottom port. The OSB plug is shown below, Photo 12.

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Photo 12

Step 11—Now, it’s time to buy and install a power plug. The 2-hp motor comes pre-wired for 220V, although it can be rewired for 110V. I will be using the 220V pre-wired setup.

Page 69 calls for a 6-15 plug, I have opted to use a 6-20 plug, which is rated for 20 amps. (The 6-15 plug is rated for 15 amps.)

Also, I elected to use a right-angle plug. I just prefer having the cord run parallel to the wall instead of having the cord leave the wall outlet area at a right-angle to the wall.

Regarding the lugs fasten to the plug end of the band saw cord—I went to Lowe’s, Home Depot, and five electrical supply houses—and none of them carried a plug, which would accept the lugs on the band saw cord.

So I called Grizzly for an answer regarding the above lug issue. Grizzly said they ship their band saws with lugs to keep the stranded wiring from fraying. They said to just cut the lugs off (Grizzly said it would not void the warranty) and install my plug. And that is what I did, and here is a photo (Photo 13) of the cord & plug.

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Photo 13

Step 12—A test run was next. I engaged the tension lever, plugged the power cord in, and hit the “run” button. The band saw ran smoothly (no noticeable vibration or rubbing noises, nice job Grizzly).

However, if something is not right (any unusual noise or vibration), then reference your owner’s manual (the troubleshooting section—page 57 thru 59) or call Grizzly Tech Support at (570) 546-9663.

Step 13—Setup the required blade tensioning as follows:

To properly tension the blade, I elected to use the deflection method (as described by my Grizzly band saw manual), which consists of the following steps:

(1) Raise the guide post all the way up and move the upper and lower blade guides away from the blade as shown in Photos 6 and 7.

(2) Ensure that the blade is still tracking properly–traveling on the center of the top wheel. Proper blade tracking is covered by Step 8.

(3) Engage the tension lever by rotating the handle counterclockwise to the position shown in Photo 14.

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Photo 14

(5) With moderate pressure, push the center of the blade sideways.
—–If the blade deflects 1/4”, it is tensioned correctly.
—–If the blade deflects less than 1/4”, it is over-tensioned. Turn the blade-tensioning handwheel counterclockwise as required to achieve 1/4” deflection.
—–If the blade deflects more than 1/4”, it is under-tensioned. Turn the blade-tensioning handwheel clockwise as required to achieve 1/4” deflection.

I used the setup shown below (Photo 15) to assist me in measuring the blade deflection. As you can see, I used masking taped to tape a 6” metal ruler to the top of the 3/4″ x 4”x 6” OSB, and then I clamped the OSB to the miter gauge shown. It worked out well.

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Photo 15

Step 14—After tensioning the blade, adjust the distance between the front of the blade guides and the bottom of the blade teeth gullets for both the upper and lower blade guides.

Now this band saw is made by Grizzly, and they recommend a distance of 0.016” between the bottom of the blade teeth gullets and the front of the blade guides. However, from my readings on setting up band saws, I have seen values ranging from 0.016” to 1/16”—for the distance between the bottom of the blade teeth gullets and the front of the blade guides.

Personally, I am going to use 1/16”. I like the idea of more cushion between the bottoms of the blade gullets and the front of the blade guides; plus, I like being able to use a 1/16” drill bit to measure this distance—easier for this woodworker to see.

Photo 16 below—for the upper blade guides–shows the 1/16” spacing between the bottom of the blade gullets and the front edge of the blade guides. I removed the front thumb screw while taking this photo, to provide a more unobstructed view of the blade gullets and blade guides.

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Photo 16

Photo 17 below—for the lower blade guides–shows the 1/16” spacing between the bottom of the blade gullets and the front edge of the blade guides. Again, I removed the front thumb screw, while taking this photo, to provide a more unobstructed view of the blade gullets and blade guides.

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Photo 17

Step 15—Next on the agenda is the adjusting of the blade guides. Now Grizzly recommends a 0.004” clearance between each blade guide and adjacent saw blade side, and that is approximately what I used. I say approximately because I used a cut strip of Mylar (a thin polyester film), which is 0.005”-thick.

I don’t see a 0.001” variation being a deal breaker. After all, that is only about a 1/4 the thickness of a sheet of copy paper. Plus, it is durable. I keep it in a shoe box along with my other band saw adjusting paraphernalia.

The first photo below (Photo 18) shows the upper blade guides and a Mylar strip being used to adjust the gap between each blade guide and adjacent blade side to 0.005”, which is the thickness of the Mylar strip shown being used.

I adjusted the gap between the blade guides and blade as follows:

(1) With thumb and forefinger, apply light pressure (just enough to keep Mylar strip secure between the blade guides and blade) at points “A” & “B”, which are referenced in Photo 18.

(2) Tighten the two thumb screws and remove the Mylar strip.

(3) By hand, spin the upper band saw wheel and check that the blade guides do not rotate. If one or both of the blade guides rotate, then readjust the blade guides as required–maintain the gap at 0.005”.

If a blade guide rotates on you, it just means that enough uneven pressure was applied at either point “A” or “B” and caused one of the blade guides to deflect the blade off of its neutral position. And when the pressure on points “A” & “B” was removed the blade moved back against the blade guide, which had been exerting the most pressure against the band saw blade.

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Photo 18

This next photo (Photo 19) shows the Mylar strip again being used on the lower blade guides to adjust the gap between each blade guide and adjacent blade side to 0.005”.

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Photo 19

The procedure for adjusting the gap between the lower blade guides and the blade is the same procedure described above for the upper blade guides and blade.

Step 16—Adjusting the support bearings–but before going through the adjusting of the upper and lower support bearings, it is worth noting that the upper and lower support bearings are not mirror images of one another.

For the upper support bearing, the adjusting of the support bearing is not independent of any adjusting made to the blade guides. If you first adjust the support bearing and then adjust the blade guides, the support bearing setting will move by however much you move the blade guides. Bottom line, the upper blade guides must be adjusted first before adjusting the upper support bearing.

For the lower support bearing, the adjusting of the support bearing is independent of any adjusting made to the blade guides. In other words, you can adjust either the lower support bearing or lower blade guides first.

Regarding a recommended clearance value between the back of the blade and the support bearings, Grizzly recommends 0.016”. However, from my readings on setting up band saws, I have seen values ranging from 0.004” to .016”—for the distance from the back of the blade to the support bearings. And I saw 0.004” or close to it being used the most, in my limited readings on setting up band saws.

Personally, I am going to use 0.004”, for two reasons.

First, I like the idea of the clearance between the back of the blade and the support bearings being significantly less than the clearance between the bottom of the blade gullets and the front of the blade guides. This way, the blade if pushed back against the support bearings will only move back 0.004”, and the original clearance of 1/16” between the bottom of the blade gullets and the front of the blade guides will only be reduced by 0.004”. That means there will still be plenty of cushion between the bottom of the blade gullets and the front of the blade guides, and what is there not to like about that.

Second, a finer clearance between the blade guides and the support bearings means that more of the blade will be between the blade guides and therefore being guided by the blade guides.

Let’s start with adjusting the upper support bearing:

As shown below in Photo 20, the blade guard complicates getting to and adjusting the upper support bearing. Therefore, I removed the two cap screws shown below, then raised the blade guard up, and then clamped it in place—as shown in Photo 21.

P20N--DSC05507
Photo 20

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Photo 21

Shown in Photo 21 is a scrap piece of plywood (1/2” x 2” x 3”) that I used to raise the blade guard up above the upper support bearing. Also, shown in Photo 21 are two clamps—one clamp secures the scrap piece of plywood, and the other clamp secures the blade guard in place.

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Photo 22

Adjusting the Upper Support Bearing
(1) After loosening the support bearing shaft cap screw, place a Mylar strip (0.005”-thick) between the back of the blade and the front of the support bearing as shown in Photo 22. Apply just enough pressure to keep the Mylar strip secure between the back of the blade and the front of the support bearing.

(2) Re-tighten the support bearing shaft cap screw and remove the Mylar strip.

(3) By hand, spin the upper band saw wheel and check that the support bearing does not rotate. If it does rotate, then reinsert the Mylar strip and readjust the gap between the back of the blade and the front of the support bearing as required–maintain the gap at 0.005”.

If the support bearing rotates on you, it probably just means that you applied a wee bit too much pressure against the back of the blade, or the support bearing shifted toward and against the back of the blade when you tighten the support bearing shaft cap screw. That’s my theory.

Next, let’s adjust the lower support bearing:

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Photo 23

Adjusting the Lower Support Bearing
(1) Again after loosening the support bearing shaft cap screw, place a Mylar strip (0.005”-thick) between the back of the blade and the front of the support bearing, which is not shown in Photo 23; however, insert Mylar strip as shown in Photo 22. Apply just enough pressure to keep Mylar strip secure between the back of the blade and the front of the support bearing.

(2) Re-tighten the support bearing shaft cap screw and remove the Mylar strip.

(3) By hand, spin the lower band saw wheel and check that the support bearing does not rotate. If it does rotate, then reinsert the Mylar strip and readjust the gap between the back of the blade and the front of the support bearing as required–maintain the gap at 0.005”.

Again, if the support bearing rotates on you, it probably just means that you applied a wee bit too much pressure against the back of the blade, or the support bearing shifted toward and against the back of the blade when you tighten the support bearing shaft cap screw.

Step 17—Align the table with the blade & fence as follows:

(1) For starters, the Grizzly manual states to lightly place a straightedge alongside the band saw blade. The manual also states that this operation is best performed with a 3/4” blade.

(2) However, this band saw comes with a 1/2” blade, and I do not have a 3/4” blade. Therefore, I am going to use a slightly different approach. First, I am going to take a 1x board, draw a straight line along the top of the 1x board, and then cut a penciled line with the band saw as shown in Photo 24.

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Photo 24

(3) Holding the 1x board just cut in place, lightly butt the two magnetic featherboards up against 1x board as shown in Photo 25. The Purpose of the two magnetic featherboards is to maintain the angle (drift angle) of the cut 1x board relative to the table.

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Photo 25

(4) As shown in Photo 26, move the fence over against the 1x board. Next, if need be (and it probably will be needed), loosen the four cap screws on the fence and align the fence to butt up against the 1x board.

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Photo 26

(5) Take a look at the simple jig (labeled as JIG “A” in Photo 27, you need to stop here and cobble together this jig. I built this jig out of OSB (1/2” x 6-7/8” x 18-3/8”), with an approximately 2-1/2” x 2-1/2” slot cut and located as shown—the slot will allow the OSB to clear the blade and be able to butt up against the fence.

Also, cut the miter slot runner shown, dimensions (5/16” x 3/4” x 18-3/8”), and fasten flush to the end of 1/2” OSB—as shown in Photo 27. I used 3/4” x 18-ga. brad nails to fasten the miter slot runner and 1/2” OSB together.

With JIG “A” positioned as shown in Photo 27, you are ready to align the table with the blade.

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Photo 27

(6) Loosen the four trunnion bolts shown in Photo 28, and slide the fence up against the side of JIG “A” as shown in Photo 29. The table with the trunnion bolts loosened will most likely need to be adjusted for the fence to be flush against the side of JIG “A.”

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Photo 28

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Photo 29

(7) Before re-tightening the trunnion bolts, check that the back of the blade is square to the table. I used a 6” combination square, as shown in Photo 30.

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Photo 30

As you can see from looking at Photo 30, the back of the blade and the table are not square. Looking at the combination square, you can see that I need to tilt the table clockwise to close the gap between the blade and square. Therefore, I had to shim (as required) between the table and the front trunnion plate, to rotate the table clockwise to square the table with the back of the blade.

For shimming material, I cut strips of plastic from a plastic drink cup, and I drilled 3/8” diameter holes for the trunnion bolts to pass through. The thickness of the plastic I used was 0.015”. For me, it turned out that one shim (0.015”-thick) at each end of the front trunnion plate did the trick–squared the table up with the back of the blade.

Regarding the shims, I cut 1-3/4” x 1-3/4” strips from the plastic drink cup for the shims. Holes 3/8” in diameter were drilled through the shims, for the trunnion bolts to pass through. I offset the drilled holes from the center of the shim material by 5/8” as shown in Photo 31—the 5/8” dimension shown is typical for both shims shown.

Offsetting the shim holes made for a handy handle (plastic to grab) for moving the shims about as was required to line up the shim holes with the trunnion bolt holes in the trunnion plate and table.

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Photo 31

To secure the plastic shims in place for hole drilling, I used masking tape to tape the shims to a scrap piece of 1x board, and then I placed another scrap piece of 1x board on top of the shims. Next, I taped the two 1x boards and shims all together with masking tape, as shown in Photo 32.

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Photo 32

The masking tape makes for easy fastening and unfastening. Plus, masking tape is relatively inexpensive.

(8) Re-tighten the trunnion bolts, and the table & blade are now aligned. Plus, the fence is now aligned with both the blade and also the miter slot.

Step 18—Calibrate the miter gauge relative to the blade as follows:

(1) Again, I am calibrating the miter gauge relative to the fence. Since in Step 17, I adjusted the fence to account for the drift angle. Therefore, the fence has been aligned parallel to the blade.

(2) Position a square against the face of the miter gauge and the fence as shown in Photo 33. Loosen the lock knob on the miter gauge, adjust the face of the miter gauge as required to square the miter gauge face relative to the fence, and re-tighten the lock knob on the miter gauge.

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Photo 33

Clamping the square against the fence as shown (in Photo 33) made making adjustments to the miter gauge a piece of cake. Positioning the two scrap pieces of 1/2” plywood, as shown in Photo 33, was also very helpful.

3. Resawing Video
The following short YouTube video shows this band saw being used to resaw a partial oak log, which is approximately 9” in height above the table.

Resawing with Grizzly Band Saw G0513 – YouTube

4. Summary
The 102-page Owner’s Manual proved helpful for setup and adjusting of the band saw. And the fifty-one pictorials in “Section 3: Setup” were especially worthwhile, during setup.

However, I did do some things different. For example, I used a different approach for aligning the side of the blade parallel with the miter slot. Also, I used 1/16” instead of 0.016” for the spacing between the bottom of the blade gullets and the front of the blade guides. And I used 0.004” instead of 0.016” for the spacing between the back of the blade and the support bearing.

To date, I have been entirely satisfied with my new Grizzly band saw. It runs smoothly. It cuts through thick stock with relative ease. And the 2 hp motor remains relatively cool to the touch even after resawing.

In closing, no regrets, I am thoroughly enjoying this Grizzly G0513ANV band saw. Love it.

5. Request
If you enjoyed this post, I would be very grateful if you would share it by email with a friend, on Google+, and/or Facebook. While I am being needy, would you give me a “Like” on my Facebook page (Woodworking with AJO)? You can click on the link shown below for my Facebook page. Thanks a bunch.

Woodworking with AJO | Facebook

Take care
AL

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