Plans For Building A Wall Mounted Table Saw Cabinet

Topics Covered
1. Sketch of Wall Mounted Cabinet
2. Cut List
3. Dadoes for Saw Blade Shelving
4. Dadoes for Miscellaneous Table Saw Accessories
5. Carcase Assembly
6. Interior Vertical Board for Blades
7. Interior Vertical Board for Miscellaneous Table Saw Accessories
8. Time to Modify the Blade-Shelving Boards
9. Install the Backboard
10. Ledger Board
11. Fasten Cabinet to Wall
12. Install Shelving Boards
13. Trim for the Cabinet
14. Coat of Poly
15. In Closing
16. Request

If you have been toying with the idea of building a wall-mounted cabinet for your table saw blades and accessories, what follows is one possibility for your consideration.

1. Sketch of Wall Mounted Cabinet
Here is a sketch and overall dimensions of what I came up with.
SKETCH 1--CABINET with TRIM

Sketch 1

A SketchUp file of the above sketch can be downloaded using the following link:
TABLE SAW CABINET with TRIM SCENES – 3D Warehouse

Up to 13 blades and umpteen miscellaneous table saw accessories will have a place to call home with this cabinet.

The cabinet shown above (Sketch 1) was built using 3/4” and 1/2” OSB, and the cabinet width I used was dictated by available wall space.

2. Cut List
For the 3/4” OSB, you will need to cut five boards to the following dimensions:
Top Board
3/4” x 11-1/4” x 28-5/8”

Bottom Board
3/4” x 11-1/4” x 28-5/8”

Back Board
3/4” x 18-7/8” x 28-5/8”

Vertical Boards
For now, cut two boards with the dimensions of each board to be 3/4” x 17-7/16” x 23-1/2”. These two vertical boards, after cutting the dadoes, will then be cut into a total of four vertical boards (each board will be 3/4” x 11-1/4” x 17-7/16”), after cutting dadoes.

The vertical board dimension of 23-1/2” shown above is over by one-inch of what is actually required, but I chose 23-1/2” somewhat arbitrarily to account for the saw blade kerf width plus provide for some wiggle room during the cutting process.

For the 1/2” OSB, you will need to cut the following:
Saw Blade Shelving
1/2” x 11-1/4” x 11-1/2” (a total of 13 shelves required)

Miscellaneous Table Saw Accessories Shelving
1/2” x 5” x 11-1/4” (a total of 4 shelves required)

For the trim, cut from 1 x 4 pine, you will need to cut the following:
Regarding the following six trim pieces, wait until the rest of the cabinet has been built before cutting the trim—just in case any dimensional variations occur during the build. After all, we all want tight-fitting trim.

Horizontal Trim
1/4” x 3/4” x 28-5/8” (a total of two pieces required)

Vertical Trim
1/4” x 3/4” x 17-7/16” (a total of four pieces required)

3. Dadoes for Saw Blade Shelving
Remember the two vertical boards above, under “2. Cut List,” well grab one of those two vertical boards. And, dado 1/2” wide x 3/8” deep grooves as shown in the following sketch: spacing between dadoed grooves is 1/2”.

SKETCH 2--VB FOR BLADE GROOVES
Sketch 2

After dadoing the board shown above (Sketch 2) cut the board into two boards: dimension each board to 3/4” x 11-1/4” x 17-7/16”.

Not cutting the board into two boards until after dadoing helps to ensure that the grooves in the two boards are aligned with one another, and that the shelving boards are sitting level and not at an angle to the carcase bottom board.

4. Dadoes for Miscellaneous Table Saw Accessories
Take the remaining vertical board above, under “2. Cut List,” and dado 1/2” wide x 3/8” deep grooves as shown in the following sketch: spacing between dadoed grooves is as shown in Sketch 3 below.

SKETCH 3--VB ACCESSORIES
Sketch 3

After dadoing the board shown above (Sketch 3) cut the board into two boards: dimension each board to 3/4” x 11-1/4” x 17-7/16”.

Again, by not cutting the board into two boards until after dadoing helps to ensure that the grooves in the two boards are aligned with one another and that the shelving boards are sitting level and not at an angle to the carcase bottom board.

5. Carcase Assembly
Butt joint and screw the top board, bottom board, and two vertical boards together, as shown in the following sketch.

SKETCH 4--CARCASE
Sketch 4

For the record, the carcase back board will be the next-to-last board required by this project to be installed. Trim will be the last wood installed.

I used squares (that I made out of OSB scraps) to square up the carcase. And, my OSB squares being used to square up the carcase are illustrated in the following photo.

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Photo 1

I used drywall screws (#8 x 2-1/2”) thru out the building of this cabinet. However, some people find drywall screws to be too brittle: your call regarding type screws to use.

Regarding the #8 drywall screws, I used a 1/8” dia. drill bit for drilling the pilot holes, an 11/64” dia. drill bit for drilling the clearance holes, and then I used a countersink for countersinking the holes for each screw.

The placement of screws, which fasten the top board to the two outside vertical boards, is shown in Sketch 5 below. This fastening scheme also applies to the two interior vertical boards, for fastening the top board to the two interior vertical boards.

SKETCH 5--TOP BOARD SCREW PLACEMENT
Sketch 5

For fastening the bottom board to the two outside vertical boards, placement of screws is as shown in the following sketch.

I used the additional screws shown in the following sketch for the bottom board in order to spread the weight load out over five screws (instead of three screws) on each vertical board.

SKETCH 6--BOTTOM BD FASTENING
Sketch 6

6. Interior Vertical Board for Blades
Grab the remaining vertical board with 1/2” spacing between grooves and position it as shown in the following sketch.

SKETCH 7--VB FOR ACCESSORIES
Sketch 7

To square up the two vertical boards associated with the shelving for the blades, cut two 3/4” OSB spacers for aligning the two vertical boards. These two temporary OSB spacers are shown in the following photo, and the dimensions for each of the two temporary spacers are 3/4” x 10-3/4” x 13-1/2” as shown in the following photo.

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Photo 2

Shoot four 1-1/4” length brad nails (18 ga.) into each of the two temporary OSB spacers shown above to hold them in place while aligning, squaring up, and fastening with screws the “interior vertical board” labeled in Photo 2 above.

After installing the interior vertical board labeled in Photo 2, remove the temporary spacers that are also shown and labeled in Photo 2. Since the two temporary OSB spacers are 13-1/2” in length vs an 11-1/4” dimension for the top and bottom boards (the 11-1/4” dimension being from front to back of cabinet), the spacers can be easily removed by tapping on the end of each spacer with a mallet.

7. Interior Vertical Board for Miscellaneous Table Saw Accessories
Grab the last remaining vertical board, labeled as “LAST REMAINING VERTICAL BOARD” IN Photo 3, and position it as shown in Photo 3.

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Photo 3

To square up the board labeled “LAST REMAINING VERTICAL BOARD” in the above photo, I installed the shelving boards shown above, and then clamped the two vertical boards shown and shelving together as shown in Photo 3.

Dimensions for each of the four shelving boards shown in Photo 3 are 1/2” x 5” x 11-1/4”.

Also, the orange triangle in Photo 3 was placed up against the board labeled “LAST REMAINING VERTICAL BOARD” to ensure that this vertical board and the bottom board were square to one another.

After squaring up and fastening the “LAST REMAINING VERTICAL BOARD,” remove the four shelving boards, shown in Photo 3. Removing the four shelving boards will make fastening the cabinet to the wall much easier when it comes time to fasten the cabinet to the wall.

8. Time to Modify the Blade-Shelving Boards
Up above under “2. Cut List,” the requirement for thirteen blade-shelving boards with each board to be cut to 1/2” x 11-1/4” x 11-1/2” was given.

Now, it is time to drill out a 1” radius opening in each of the thirteen shelving boards. Additional dimensional data is given in the following sketch.

Rationale for drilling out a 1” radius opening is to assist in removing blades from the cabinet and placing blades back into the cabinet.

SKETCH 8--BLADE SHELVING BOARD
Sketch 8

A drill press set up as shown in the following photo is ideal for drilling out the half-circle shown in Sketch 8.

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Photo 4

To ensure identical drilling of all thirteen of your blade-shelving boards, use the setup shown in Photo 4. Position the two dimensioned boards (shown in Photo 4) and shoot four brad nails (1-1/4” length) into each dimensioned board, to secure in place while drilling the thirteen blade-shelving boards.

Dimensions shown for the two dimensioned boards are not critical–use what boards you have available.

The two clamps, shown in Photo 4, keep the blade-shelving boards from moving while drilling, and they will move if not clamped in place.

After drilling all of the blade-shelving boards, you are now almost ready to install the blade-shelving boards. I say almost, because, I found that I needed to run a belt sander across approximately one-inch of each side of the blade-shelving boards that run thru the vertical board grooves: otherwise the fit was too tight.

Now, after belt sanding the blade-shelving boards as required to fit the vertical board grooves, put the shelving aside and don’t install until after the cabinet has been fastened (with screws) to your wall studs.

9. Install the Backboard
As elsewhere throughout this build, #8 x 2-1/2” drywall screws are used for fastening the backboard to the rest of the cabinet carcase. Drill a 1/8” dia. pilot hole, 11/64” clearance hole (thru backboard), and then used a countersink for countersinking the holes for each screw.

The placement of the screws, which fasten the backboard to the rest of the cabinet carcase, is shown in Sketch 9 below.

SKETCH 9--BACKBOARD
Sketch 9

Word of caution regarding the two screws located 10-3/32” above the bottom of the backboard, you need to be careful when drilling and installing these two screws to ensure they clear the grooves on the associated vertical boards.

If you cut the backboard a tad greater, both length- and width-wise, you can then take a belt sander and sand it down to a perfect coplanar fit with the rest of the cabinet carcase. That’s what I did.

10. Ledger Board
As a means of ensuring that the cabinet is installed level, I leveled and fastened the ledger board shown in the following photo. Plus, it provides additional support for the cabinet.

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Photo 5

Dimensions for the OSB ledger board are 3/4” x 4” x 28-3/4”.

Next, locate your wall studs and use 3” length screws, two screws at each available wall stud, to fasten ledger board to wall studs.

Now, since I am installing the cabinet in front of a boarded-up window, I don’t have wall studs to fasten to. Therefore, I used three toggle bolts (1/4” x 3”), which are shown in the following photo.

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Photo 6

11. Fasten Cabinet to Wall
To fasten the cabinet to the wall, lift the cabinet up, get it lined up with the ledger board, and shoot three brad nails (#18 ga. x 2” length) thru the back of the cabinet and into each available wall stud.

Next, hold the cabinet in place while you drill and install screws thru the backboard of the cabinet and into your wall studs. Now, install three screws on each wall stud, place 1st screw about 2” from the cabinet top, approximately center the 2nd screw between the top and bottom of the cabinet, and place the 3rd screw about 2” from the bottom of the cabinet.

12. Install Shelving Boards
After fastening the cabinet to your wall studs, you can now install all the shelving boards, both blade shelving and miscellaneous table saw accessories shelving boards.

13. Trim for the Cabinet
To dress it up, just a little, I ripped 3/4”-wide x 1/4”-thick strips of trim from a 1 x 4 piece of pine. And, the trim, applied to the cabinet, is shown in the following photo.

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Photo 7

I used glue and pin nails (3/4” length) to fasten the trim to the cabinet.

For the trim strips, I used ten pin nails for each trim strip. I space the ten pin nails in pairs as follows: two pins shot a 1/2” from each end of the trim, two pins shot at the center of the trim, and two pins shot midway between the center of the trim and the two pins at each end of the trim.

Regarding the vertical-trim strips, positioning pins a 1/2” from each end is ok, but the positioning of the pins along the interior of the vertical-trim strips will need to be positioned to miss the grooves in the vertical boards.

Concerning the positioning of the paired pins, I shot the pins at 3/16” from each edge of the trim.

14. Coat of Poly
Personally, for the finish, I used a brush to coat the cabinet exterior with one coat of one-part polyurethane plus one-part paint thinner.

I was just looking to apply something, which would go on easily, without leveling issues, and dry quickly. This simple concoction met all three of those requirements.

15. In Closing
You will find this cabinet to be relatively easy to build, and you will find it convenient for keeping your blades and numerous table saw accessories together in one place.

If you can fasten the cabinet on a wall next to your table saw, that would be ideal. Then, you can grab what you need from your cabinet while still at your table saw—no wasted steps.

Shown in Photo 7(up above) is what I currently have in my cabinet: blades, dado blades and chippers, push shoes, magnetic featherboards, wrenches, and a few other odds and ends.

Bet your blades and table saw accessories would love to call this cabinet their home, and I bet you would love having your blades and various table saw accessories readily accessible in one cabinet.

16. Request
If you enjoyed this post, I would be very grateful if you would share it by email with a friend, or on Google+, and/or Facebook. While I am being needy, would you give me a “Like” on my Facebook page (Woodworking with AJO)? You can click on the link shown below for my Facebook page. Thanks a bunch.

Woodworking with AJO | Facebook

Take Care
AL

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