Wall Holder for Table Saw Miter Gauge

Have noticed that I use my table saw more for ripping then cross cutting. Therefore, I decided to remove my miter gauge from my table saw, and hang it on the wall next to my table saw. Then if I need to cross cut, I can grab my wall mounted miter gauge, and make the req’d cross cuts.


The Basic Design:
The basic design I came up with, is shown in Sketch #1 below. It’s sketchy, but I like it. It gives the gist of what I plan to build, without being overly detailed.

Sketch #1

Boards Required:
Pictured below (Photo #1) are the boards req’d for this project.

Photo #1

Board Dimensions:
Board 1———— 13″ x 1-1/2″ x 3/4″
Boards 2 & 3—— 13″ x 4-7/16″ x 3/4″ (For each board)
Board 4———— 3-7/8″ x 1-1/2″ x 3/4″
Boards 5 & 6—— 4-7/16″ x 3-7/8″ x 3/4″ (For each board)
Boards 7 thru 11— 4-3/8″ (Vertical Leg) x 3-11/16″ (Horizontal Leg) x 3/4″ (Thickness)

Lets Put This Rig Together:

Step 1
I started by drawing a reference horizontal line, as shown in Photo #2 below.

Photo #2

Next, I brad nailed a temporary ledger board up against the horizontal line drawn in Photo #2. The bottom of the miter gauge holder will rest on top of the ledger board, as shown in Photo #3. Ledger board was removed after the miter gauge holder was fastened to the wall.

Photo #3

Step 2
I clamped boards 2 & 3 together as shown in Photo #4. And proceeded to brad nail the two boards together with 1-1/2″ brad nails as shown in Photo #5.

Photo #4

 

Photo #5

Assembly of boards 5 & 6 is identical to the process for boards 2 & 3.

Step 3
Next on the agenda, cutting the triangular shaped wood members (Boards 7 thru 11).
Cutting of boards 7 thru 11:

  • Ripped a 1 x 6 board (Approx. 36″ in length) to 4-3/8″ width.
  • Laid out the measurements shown on Photo #6.

Photo #6

 

 

  • I set my bevel gauge to match the angled pencil line shown in Photo #6. Next, I set the angle on my chop saw to match the angle set on the bevel gauge, as shown in Photo #7.

Photo #7

  • Photo #8 shows me using my chop saw to cut a typical board for boards 7 thru 11. After making a cut on the chop saw, I would go to my table saw to square up the board end being used to cut boards 7 thru 11. And then back to my chop saw to cut the next board (For boards 7 thru 11).

Photo #8

Step 4
Now that boards 7 thru 11 have been cut, it’s time to fasten boards 7, 8, & 9 to boards 2 & 3, and fasten the other two boards 10 & 11 to boards 5 & 6. Photo #9 shows three sets of penciled lines, which mark where boards 7, 8, & 9 will be placed.

Photo #9

Placement of boards 7, 8, & 9:

  • Place board 7 such that the left side of board 7 is 3/4″ from the left edge of
    boards 2 & 3.
  • Center board 8 at the center of boards 2 & 3.
  • Place board 9 such that the right edge of board 9 is 3/4″ from the right side of
    boards 2 & 3.

I fastened the three boards 7, 8, & 9, to boards 2 & 3 with a total of 12, 1-1/2″ brad nails. Four brads for each of the three boards 7, 8, & 9.

In my mind, the function of the brad nails was to hold the three boards 7, 8, & 9 in place. The real holding power here would be the dry wall screws which I installed next.

To install the dry wall screws (2-1/4″ length), I started by drilling 1/8″ diameter pilot holes. Photo #10 shows me installing dry wall screws. Three dry wall screws were used to fasten board 2 to boards 7, 8, & 9. Similarly, three dry wall screws were used to fasten board 3 to boards 7, 8, & 9. Photo #10 shows where the dry wall screws were located. I basically located the dry wall screws to be fastened at the half way point on
boards 7, 8, & 9.

Photo #10

The fastening of boards 10 & 11 to boards 5 & 6 is basically the same as the fastening of boards 7, 8, & 9 to boards 2 & 3. However, instead of three support brackets (Boards 7, 8, & 9), there’s only two support brackets (Boards 10 & 11). Also, the placement of boards 10 & 11 differs as follows:

  • Place board 10 such that the left side of board 10 is approx. 3/16″ from the left edge of boards 5 & 6.
  • Place board 11 such that the right side of board 11 is approx. 3/16″ from the right edge of boards 5 & 6.

Step 5
Time to fasten board 1 to board 2 with 1-1/2″ length brad nails, as shown in Photo #11.

Photo #11

Note in Photo #11, the use of fence boards which are clamped to board 2 as shown. With this scheme, I can press board 1 against the two fence boards (Temporary boards), and brad nail board 1 to board 2. I used 1-1/2″ length brad nails. Using the fence boards shown, insured that the bottom edge of board 1 would be coplanar with the bottom side of board 2.

Board 1 functions as a rail, to prevent the miter gauge from slipping off of it’s wall holder. That would be a depressing event.

The fastening of board 4 to board 5 is identical to the fastening of board 1 to board 2, outlined above in Step 5.

Attaching the Finished Product to the Wall
The finished miter gauge wall holder was placed on top of the ledger board shown in Photo #3, shown toward the beginning of this post. The miter gauge wall holder was fastened to the wall with 1-1/2″ brad nails. The wall I am fastening to here consists of 3/4″ thick boards.

The Finished Product
Finished product, I like it. The wall holder has proved to be conveniently located for my miter gauge being on the wall next to my table saw, and it keeps my miter gauge out of harms’ way. Here’s one last photo, showing the wall holder & miter gauge.

 

If you enjoyed this post, I would be very grateful if you would share it by email with a friend, or on Google+, and/or Facebook. While I am being needy, would you give me a “Like” on my Facebook page (Woodworking with AJO)? You can click on the link shown below for my Facebook page. Thanks a bunch.

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Until next time, Take care
AL

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