Removing A Jammed Brad Nail from My Brad Nailer

All was going well until my Brad Nailer jammed. This came about while I was fastening an OSB workbench top to the carriage underneath. That’s the jammed brad nail in the photo below.

Basically half of the brad nail was jammed in the Brad Nailer and the other half of the brad nail was in the OSB sheet. So I used the diagonal cutters shown in the photo below to cut the brad nail free from the OSB sheet.

But before going any further, I should point out that the Brad Nailer was not at fault. Best I can tell, where I shot this brad nail, there was a deck screw present in the carriage below the OSB sheet. Apparently the brad nail hit the deck screw dead-on such that it didn’t ricochet one way or the other. My bad.

To remove the now mangled brad nail, I now needed to partially dismantle the tip end of the Brad Nailer This requires an allen wrench. Glad to say that my Craftsman Brad Nailer (Model No. 351.181720) comes with the req’d allen wrench, which is attached to the side of the Brad Nailer. Nice feature. The allen wrench attached to my Brad Nailer is shown in the photo below.

Required Disassemble
Step 1 — Remove the Driver Guide Cover shown in the following two photos.
The first photo below shows the Driver Guide Cover and two allen screws that secure the
Driver Guide Cover to the Brad Nailer.

This next photo shows the Driver Guide Cover & associated two allen screws removed
from the Brad Nailer.

Step 2 — Remove the 3 allen screws holding the Stationary Driver Guide Plate in place.
The Stationary Driver Guide Plate and 3 allen screws are shown in the following photo.
The 2 bottom holes are where the 2 allen screws for the Driver Guide Cover go.
The remaining 3 holes are where the 3 allen screws for the Stationary Driver Guide
Plate go.

Removal of Jammed & Mangled Brad Nail
Step 1 — With needle nose pliers I grabbed the brad nail. The end of the brad nail exposed below the tip of my Brad Nailer. I twisted the brad nail back & forth gently, but to no avail.
Step 2 — Time for Plan “B”. Again I grabbed the brad nail with a pair of needle nose pliers. But this time I grabbed the brad nail such that I could twist the brad nail gently around the needle nose pliers. During this twisting procedure I gently worked at removing the jammed brad nail along the length of the Stationary Driver Guide Plate & the Movable Driver Guide Plate. Plan “B” worked and the jammed brad nail was successfully extracted from my Brad Nailer.

A photo of the mangled brad nail wrapped around the needle nose pliers is shown in the
following photo.

A photo of the Stationary & Movable Driver Guide Plates is shown in the photo below.

The Stationary Driver Guide Plate is the plate in front with five threaded holes. The allen
screws have been removed from the five threaded holes. The Movable Driver Guide Plate
is the Rear Plate shown with one allen screw present in it.

Another Stationary Plate member (Lets call it Plate “A”) that the brad nail has to be worked pass is shown in the photo below. Plate “A” is on the left side of the brad nail, and the Stationary Driver Guide Plate is on the right side of the brad nail. Directly below Plate “A” but not shown in this photo since it has been retracted back, is the Movable Driver Guide Plate. The Movable Driver Guide Plate presses the brad nails in the Brad Nailer magazine up against the Stationary Driver Guide Plate.

The photo below gives you another view of what’s covered by the photo above and the
verbiage associated with the photo above.

Step 3 — There was still a sliver of the brad nail molded in place against the Brad Nailer. This sliver is shown in the following photo.

In the photo below I show my Gerber knife that I used to scrape the brad nail sliver from
my Brad Nailer.

Closing Remarks
I reversed the process for reassembling the Brad Nailer and got back to work on my workbench.

So if you end up in a jam (Like me), I hope what has been shown & discussed here will prove to be useful.

If you enjoyed this post, I would be very grateful if you would share it by email with a friend, or on Google+, and/or Facebook. While I am being needy, would you give me a “Like” on my Facebook page (Woodworking with AJO)? My Facebook page “Like” button is on the right side of this page, or you can click on the link shown below for my Facebook page. Thanks a bunch.

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Until next time, take care.
AL

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