No Darn Info for Achieving Specific Honing Guide Angles

Topics Covered

  1. Dilemma
  2. Angle Jig
  3. How to Use the “Angle Jig”
  4. Jig for Setting the Honing Guide Angle

Dilemma
If you bought your Honing Guide new, then odds are the packaging included instructions. The instructions should cover how far your blade needs to project beyond the front of the Honing Guide, to achieve a given angle. For the Honing Guide I bought, dimensions for achieving 25 and 30 deg angles were given. And I built the Honing Guide jig shown below.

Well that’s just great if you have instructions, but what if you do not have instructions ? Then how do you go about putting together a Honing Guide jig ? Those are the questions I will address, in this Post.

Angle Jig
I typically hone my blades first to 25 degrees, and then follow with honing a 30 deg micro-bevel. Therefore my, “Angle Jig”, discussion here will be based on the above two angles (25 & 30 degrees).

Steps for Building Your “Angle Jig”

Step 1 — First, I need a base for my “Angle Jig”. What I came up with was three
layers of 3/4″ thick OSB sandwiched together. The dimensions I used for the OSB were
7-1/2″ x 5″ x 3/4″, for each of the three pieces of OSB.

Step 2 — Take two of the three pieces of OSB, just cut to 7-1/2″ x 5″ x 3/4″, and brad
nail the two pieces of OSB together. I used 1-3/16″ length brad nails. The two pieces, of OSB brad nailed together, are shown in the Photo below.

The two pieces of OSB were fastened together with a total of 16 brad nails.
Eight brad nails were located as shown below. The two layers of OSB were
then flipped over, and another eight brad nails were shot into the other side of the two layers of OSB.

Step 3 — The third piece of OSB is special. It’s the piece that the 25 & 30 deg angled
cut OSB pieces (They will be discussed shortly) will be attached to.

You need to make the following additions, to this third piece of OSB. First cut
two strips of OSB. Dimensions of each strip of OSB are 7″ x 1-5/8″ x 3/4″.
Fasten the two strips of OSB, to the 7-1/2″ x 5″ x 3/4″ OSB, as shown in the
Photo below.

In order to insure an accurate 3/4″ spacing between the two OSB strips in the Photo above, I placed a 3/4″ OSB spacer between the two OSB strips. After the two OSB strips were secured with brad nails, I removed the 3/4″ OSB spacer. The 3/4″ OSB spacer setup is shown in the following Photo.

Step 4 — Now it’s time to take a scrap piece of OSB, and cut a 25 deg angle. This angled cut piece of OSB is the brains of this Angle Jig, so to speak.

The OSB I used was 23″ x 3-5/8″ x 3/4″. I used my chop saw as shown in the Photo below, to cut the 25 deg angle.

Step 5 — Next, I first cut the board at a 25 deg angle. Then I made a zero deg cut. Both of these cuts are shown in the above Photo.

The dimensions of the board, with the 25 deg angle, are shown in the following Photo.

Step 6 — Next take the dimensioned & 25 deg angled OSB member shown in Step 5 above, and fasten it to the OSB parts put together in Step 3 above.

The 25 deg OSB member basically gets plugged into the slot between the two OSB strips.

This makes for a snug fit. The nice thing about this scheme, if you want another angle or
angles down the road, you can cut any angle you want. And plug it into the slot between the two OSB strips.

The 25 deg angle OSB piece is shown plugged into the slot between the two OSB strips, in the Photo below.

Step 7 — Take another scrap piece of wood, I used OSB, and cut a 30 deg angle. The OSB I used was 23″ x 3-5/8″ x 3/4″. I used my chop saw, to cut the 30 deg angle.

The dimensions of the board, with the 30 deg angle, are shown in the following Photo.

Step 8 — And just like the 25 deg cut OSB piece, take the 30 deg cut OSB piece and plug it into the top half of the Angle Jig (Assembled in Step 3 above). This is shown in the Photo below.

Although both the 25 & 30 deg angles are shown plugged-in, I typically only plug-in the angled OSB piece to be currently used.

Step 9 — Lastly, take the assembly shown in the above Photo, and fasten it to the two pieces of OSB from Step 2. For fastening the OSB from Step 2 to the OSB in Step 3, I used #9 x 2-1/2″ length deck type screws. This way, if I need a different base height for my 25 and 30 deg angled wood members, I can easily fabricate another base height. To fabricate a different base height, just remove the four deck screws shown in the Photo below.

The “Angle Jig” is now complete. Ain’t she pretty ?

How to Use the “Angle Jig”
I am going to use the step-by-step process again. Maybe it’s just me, but I like the step-by-step explanation method. Anyway, here we go.

Let me preface this by saying that for the following discussion, I will be using the lower jaws of the Honing Guide.

The procedure for using the lower or upper jaws of the Honing Guide is the same, however. For the upper jaws, the 12″ rule used for the lower jaws was not wide enough for the upper jaws. Therefore for the upper jaws of the Honing Guide, I bought a 48″ length metal rule and cut it down to a 12″ length. This gave me a metal bar 12″ x 2″ x 3/32″, and this worked out quiet nicely for the upper jaws.

Step 1 — Use of the lower jaws is for honing chisels. However, I used a 12″ steel rule in place of a chisel, that I removed from a combination square. The use of the 12″ rule makes working with the Angle Jig, and the Honing Guide, more manageable. Plus, I will be using a tack hammer on the end of the 12″ rule. And obviously, using a tack hammer on a chisel blade would be a bad idea.

Below is a shot of my 12″ rule attached to the Honing Guide.

Step 2 — If the Honing Guide wheel is floating in midair as shown in the Photo below, then the 12″ rule is projecting to far beyond the front of the Honing Guide.

Here’s where the tack hammer comes into play.

If the Honing Guide wheel is floating in midair, as noted in the Photo above, then tap the 12″ rule with the tack hammer as shown in the Photo below. Goal here is to lessen the distance the 12″ rule projects beyond the front of the Honing Guide.

Step 3 — If the end of the 12″ rule is in midair as shown in the Photo below, then the 12″ rule doesn’t project far enough beyond the front of the Honing Guide.

If the 12″ rule is floating in midair, as noted in the above Photo, then tap the 12″ rule with the tack hammer as shown in the Photo below. Goal here is to increase the distance the 12″ rule projects beyond the front of the Honing Guide.

Step 4 — Armed with your tack Hammer, either tap the 12″ rule to project it more or less from the front of the Honing Guide. This is a trial & error process. You will tap the 12″ rule back and forth, until the 12″ rule lines up with your work surface and Angle Jig. This is shown pictorially, in the Photo below.

Step 5 — After getting the 12″ rule lined up with your work surface and Angle Jig, as shown in the Photo above. Measure the distance from the front of the Honing Guide to the front edge of the 12″ rule. What’s req’d to be measured is illustrated in the following Photo.

Jig for Setting the Honing Guide Angle
Using the dimensions obtained above, for the distance between the front of the Honing Guide and the front edge of your blade substitute (12″ rule), transfer the dimensional values to your Honing Guide Jig.

The details for building & using a Honing Guide Jig are covered by a previous post, at the following link.

Jig for Setting Honing Guide Angle | Woodworking with AJO

Final Thoughts
I am glad I decided to make this Angle Jig. It’s relatively easy to build. That’s always a plus. And, I especially like the plug-in feature, for different angles. Being able to quickly change angles is a sweet feature.

If you enjoyed this post, I would be very grateful if you would share it by email with a friend, or on Google+, and/or Facebook. While I am being needy, would you give me a “Like” on my Facebook page (Woodworking with AJO)? My Facebook page “Like” button is on the right side of this page, or you can click on the link shown below for my Facebook page. Thanks a bunch.

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Until Next Time, Take Care
AL

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