Band Saw Housing Cover Modification

Here we go again, in my last Post, I modified my Band Saw tension adjuster. And, I am liking it big time. Now if I could just do something, to make it easier to both remove and reconnect the housing cover for the Band Saw blade & wheels.

The Band Saw I am modifying is a Sears model no. 113.243311.
Pictured below is the housing cover fastening system, that I find awkward to work with. Four clips secure the Band Saw housing cover. Removing the housing cover from the four clips is not a major issue. But, fastening the housing cover back to the Band Saw housing, I find awkward at best.

Pictured below is a closeup, of one of the four clips.

A Hinged Housing Cover
Tired of wrestling with the four clips, I decided to hinge the housing cover. Having a hinged door, that I can swing open or closed, is much more convenient.

The Steps and issues encountered in converting from clips to a hinged door are covered in the following modification steps.
Step 1 — Remove the Band Saw blade & wheels housing cover. Next remove the two clips, on the side opposite the Band Saw table. The clips to be removed are shown in the first Photo, at the top of this Post.

Step 2 — Drill Bit Sizes Used:
1) For drilling thru the Stationary Housing & Housing Cover, I used a 13/64″
dia. drill bit. I wanted a drill bit dia. that matched up with the outermost
thread dia. of the sheet metal screws. Nothing to be gained from stressing
the plastic housing assembly, and possibly causing it to crack.
2) For the four wood blocks, I drilled 1/8″ dia. pilot holes, for the #12 sheet
metal screws.

Step 3 — Cut four wood blocks, from a 1×4, to the following dimensions:
1) Cut & dimension two wood blocks, to 4-1/8″ x 2-1/2″ x 3/4″. These two
pieces will be located as shown, in the Photo below. These two wood blocks
are installed on the interior side, of what I will call the Stationary Housing.
2) Cut & dimension two wood blocks, to 4-1/4″ x 1-3/4″ x 3/4″. These two
pieces will be located as shown, in the Photo below. These two wood blocks
are installed on the interior side of the housing cover.

Step 4 — The Photo below shows four #12×1″ hex. head sheet metal screws, and dimensions. The four sheet metal screws shown are fastened to a wood block, on the interior side of the Stationary Housing. This setup is typical for both wood blocks fastened to the interior side of the Stationary Housing.

This next Photo shows both sets of four sheet metal screws, which secure wood blocks to the interior side of the Stationary Housing.

Step 5 — After the four wood blocks have been fastened, to the Stationary Housing & Housing Cover, the next step is the hinges. The Photo below shows one of the two hinges. I used a hot glue gun, to position & hold the hinge in place. With the hot glue holding the hinge in place, I fastened the hinge, to its associated wood block with #12×1″ hex. head sheet metal screws. The above procedure applies to the other hinge also.

The Photo below shows one of the hinges with #12×1″ hex. head sheet metal screws installed. The above procedure applies to the other hinge also.

Looking at the Photo above, you can see where I notched away a section of the Housing Cover lip. This was necessary, in order to enable the hinge to lie flat against both the Stationary

Housing & the Housing Cover.
I used a 1″ wide Belt Sander, as shown in the Photo below, to notch the Housing Cover lip.
Limited notching the Housing Cover lip, to width req’d for hinge as shown. You know the
routine, the procedure here applies to the other hinge also.

Step 6 — Alright, the Housing Cover is now hinged, and things are looking up. However, when I went to close the Housing Cover, it would not close. The Housing Cover was originally held on by four clips. Therefore, it could be pulled straight back from the Stationary Housing.

However, with the Housing Cover hinged on one side, the Housing Cover hits the Band Saw
table, as you attempt to swing the door, open or close. This predicament is shown in the
following Photo.

In the Photo above, I marked the Housing Cover with white chalk. Not all of the chalk lines
drawn, ended up being needed. I have marked electronically, with red lines where the Housing Cover needs to be cut. Using a Jig Saw, I cut along the red lines shown. This Jig Saw cutting allowed the Housing Cover to swing open & close, without hitting the Band Saw table.

The Photo below shows the Housing Cover after having been cut with a Jig Saw. The conflict between the Housing Cover and the Band Saw table is now eliminated.

Miscellaneous Photos
The two Photos below show how I went about clamping the Housing Cover. With the Housing Cover clamped in place, I was then able to cut on the Housing Cover, with my Jig Saw. I love my Leg Vise. I find myself using it on a regular basis.

Modification Completed
Having the Housing Cover hinged is much better than the four clip system, originally on this Band Saw. Life is good.

If you enjoyed this post, I would be very grateful if you would share it by email with a friend, or on Google+, and/or Facebook. While I am being needy, would you give me a “Like” on my Facebook page (Woodworking with AJO)? My Facebook page “Like” button is on the right side of this page, or you can click on the link shown below for my Facebook page. Thanks a bunch.

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Until Next Time, Take Care
AL

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