How I Supported My Wall Boards While Fastening

Getting closer to finishing my 8′ x 16′ workshop addition. Currently working on installing the interior wall boards. I debated whether to use Drywall or OSB. Finally decided to go with OSB versus Drywall for the following reasons:

  • The 7/16″ OSB was lighter than 1/2″ drywall, and therefore is easier for me to carry from the front of the house to the backyard where my workshop is located.
  • The drywall would involve caulking and sanding the joints. I just want to get this addition completed.
  • A drywall finish would probably look better, but hey it’s a workshop. And like I said, I just want to get this addition finished.

Having said all of the above, the subject I want to touch on today, is how I held the OSB in place while I fasten it to the wall 2 x 4 studs. Installing the bottom sheets was no problem, the floor plus a 7/16″ strip of OSB spacer, supported the OSB while I installed fasteners (1-5/8″ length drywall screws).

For the OSB sheets going in above the bottom sheets, I needed something to hold the OSB in place while I installed fasteners. What I came up with was cutting a 1-1/2″ x 1/4″ rabbet in a 28″ length of 2 x 6 pine. I cut the rabbet in order to give myself a little extra room (1/4″ in this case), when I went to slip the OSB down in between the wall studs and my 2 x 6, temporarily fastened to the wall studs. The photos and verbiage below further expand on what I did and how I did it.

The holder scheme I came up with is shown in the photo above. I located my wall board holder a 28″ length piece of 2 x 6 with a 1-1/2″ x 1/4″ rabbet, roughly centered along the 8 ft length side of the OSB. To fasten the wall board holder to the wall, I used 3″ length deck screws, two deck screws at each end of the 2 x 6. The deck screws were located as req’d to fasten to the 2 x 4 wall studs, behind the bottom sheet of OSB.

The photo above shows a side view of my OSB support holder. Note that I made it a point to place the bottom of the rabbet below the top side of the bottom sheet of OSB. I located the rabbet this way, in order to insure that the top sheet of OSB when installed would lie against the top of the bottom OSB sheet.

In the photo above, two of the wood screw holes visible after unscrewing my OSB support holder from the wall are shown. My plan is to caulk all screw holes before painting the OSB.

Although the rabbet is already cut, the photo above shows the approach I used for cutting the 1-1/2″ length side of the rabbet. The table saw blade was raised 1-1/2″ above the table top for this cut. The blade side furthest from the rip fence was setup to be 1/4″ from the rip fence. I used my magnetic featherboard to hold the 2 x 6 against the rip fence. I used my left hand to grab the upper part of the 2 x 6, and guide it across the table for this cut. The wood in this position with a 1-1/2″ base and a 5-1/2″ height is top heavy. Being top heavy, I was careful to keep a firm grip on the upper part of the 2 x 6, not let the wood wobble, and to keep the wood against the rip fence.

Again, although the rabbet is already cut, the photo above shows the approach I used for cutting the 1/4″ length side of the rabbet. The table saw blade was raised 1/4″ above the table top, for this cut. The blade side furthest from the edge of the featherboard was setup to be 1-1/2″ from the featherboard. I used my magnetic featherboard to hold the 2 x 6 against the rip fence. I used my push shoe to guide the 2 x 6 across the table for this final cut on the rabbet joint.

In closing, I was pleased with this approach I used. Raising the OSB sheets up, getting them in place, nailing the OSB with a couple of temporary nails, and fastening the OSB with drywall screws, went smoothly.

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Until Next Time, Take Care
AL

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